Pork Chops and new series of posts

As I mentioned on Tuesday, a new goal I have is to help make ordering and using a whole hog more user-friendly by providing recipes and information.

Here’s bit of info from our Pastured Pork page:

“When ordering a half or whole hog, here are the options you’ll choose from when calling the butcher:

  • Pork chops (about 23-26, 1 inch or you can ask for 2 inch cuts) – other options for chops include making them into baby back ribs (deboned chops), boneless tenderloin, ground or roasts
  • Shoulder Roasts (2) or Steaks (4-6) or Cottage Bacon (similar to ham in taste)
  • Loin Roasts (2) or Steaks (4-6)
  • Ground pork (6-12 lb of trim)
  • Ribs (2 lb)
  • Smoked Ham or Ham Roasts (can be halved or quartered)
  • Smoked Hocks or Fresh Hocks (2)
  • Side Pork (pork belly) or Smoked Bacon – thick or thin sliced (about 6-10 lbs)
  • Pork fat for rendering lard (we suggest you pay the small fee to have it ground, it renders more efficiently)
  • All meat cuts have other options like being ground or deboned if there is a cut you do not prefer”

Some of these things, like bacon and ground pork, have an endless number of recipes to choose from and are quickly used up. Others are a little more challenging depending on your background.

In the following weeks, I hope to add some links and various ideas on how to use the above cuts. Today I would like to start with pork chops!

Pork chops

  • Chops are excellent grilled. Typically I will sear them by starting the grill on high heat and then after each side has been browned for a few minutes, I will turn the temperature down to low. Be sure to watch them closely so the flame does not burn them up once the fat starts dripping.
  • Chops are also wonderful pan seared and then baked when grilling season is not an option (such as in January in Minnesota).
  • The spices I prefer to sprinkle on chops are as follows for 4 chops:
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon paprika, 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder, and 1/4 teaspoon black pepper combined and rubbed into the meat before cooking
    • Your favorite bbq rub (I really like Penzey’s spices, but there are many good all purpose bbq rubs out there).
    • Here’s a more involved bbq mix to try. This is a guess because I don’t have a specific recipe: 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon paprika, 1/8 teaspoon allspice, 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg, 1/8 teaspoon pepper, 1/16 teaspoon cayenne, 1/16 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/16 teaspoon thyme, 1/16 teaspoon ginger
  • The way my mom made pork chops was super easy and tasty too. Basically, sear four pork chops and place in a 9 by 13 inch glassware dish. Pour some cream of chicken soup over the top (if it’s too thick, thin it with 1/2 cup of milk). We make our own. Here’s a recipe similar to ours: Pinch of Yum. Sprinkle with paprika and black pepper. Mix up some stuffing (the amount from a 6 ounce box should be enough). Place stuffing on top. Cover in foil and bake for 45 minutes. Take foil off and bake another 15 minutes or until the internal temperature is 145 Fahrenheit. It’s a hearty, heavy meal… pure comfort food.
  • Tips:
    • Our pork chops come from a part Mangalista hog. The Mangalista breed of pig has a bit more back fat on it due to it’s excellent amount of vitamin rich lard. If you don’t enjoy eating this fat straight up, I recommend trimming the fat and then rendering it (melting it slowly then filtering it) to be used later for frying eggs or adding to recipes instead of butter or oil. It’s a great way to add Vitamin D to your diet this winter!
    • When cooking a pork chop. Melt some lard in the bottom of a pan on high heat. Set the chops in the pan for about a minute until slightly brown then turn the heat to low or transfer to a baking dish if you will be putting them in the oven. Searing and then cooking on low heat produces a juicier chop instead of a dry one.

These are some of our favorites, but I’d love to hear some of yours!! Please leave a comment and let us know your favorite recipes for pork chops.

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One thought on “Pork Chops and new series of posts

  1. Pingback: Roasts, my go to convenience food | Righteous Oaks Farm

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